Austin Urban Gardens

Raised Bed Gardening and Eating Well in Austin, Texas

May 1, 2010 in my Austin Urban Gardens May 1, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — austinurbangardens @ 5:49 pm
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I finally got to hang out in my own gardens a little this afternoon.  I spotted lots of new growth I’d missed the last few days of whizzing by the tomatoes, with my tail on fire, headed to someone’s house to install their gardens.  There are lots of exciting things going on in my garden right about now, and I’m pretty excited at how well everything is doing.

The strawberries are still putting out fruit, as if someone fed them strawberry crack.

More strawberries to come

And by the time the strawberries start to slow down, I will be picking blackberries from two bushes.

Blackberries to be

The Meyer Lemons are budding out, too.

Meyer Lemon toddlers

And one single peach.

Just one Peach

I spotted many more tomatoes this afternoon that I have seen the last few days.

There is a reason they call these Celebrities

Unmarked heirloom tomatos

Another unmarked heirloom

Barely an Ancho Chile Pepper

And about of a third of the onions, drying in their cool dark place.  The rest are still in the ground.

Some of the onions drying

The cucumbers are thinking hard about it, the eggplants don’t seem to be in a hurry.  The herbs are going crazy, and it’s hard to believe it is almost harvest time for the first basil.  MMM, pesto.  I’ve got lots of great Texas Olive Oil, and local parmesan laying in wait for pesto making day.

 

16 Responses to “May 1, 2010 in my Austin Urban Gardens”

  1. I’m envious of all your vegetables and fruits. But I’m also inspired. Working up to it.

    • Marc,
      Thanks for the kind comments. I’m always amazed that I can inspire anyone. I find gardening to be very little skill, just mostly hope and luck. It helps to have good soil and good weather too, but my gardens are never consistent year to year. Last year the strawberries were so/so but the tomatoes rocked. This year the strawberries are amazing and the tomatoes are OK, so far. I just keep plugging along, hoping to learn something, but I’m always glad to hear from folks, reading my gardening journey!
      Take care,
      Carla

  2. Optimista Says:

    So much delicious bounty! I didn’t know (or had forgotten) that you had a peach tree. That is SUPER cool! Thanks for sharing the progress.

    • I’ve never gotten to eat my own peaches. Someone or something else always gets to them. This time, just the one. I miss you guys. I’m ready to pull my head out of the soil, unhitch my trailer and have some fun!

  3. Marc O. Says:

    By the way, I hope you get your camera back in order soon. I generally hope my camera doesn’t suffer such a fate, but I must have about 35 back up cameras if it does. 🙂

  4. Prices t3 Says:

    Beautiful Meyer lemon toddlers. Unfortunately where I live you can’t easily obtain fresh Meyer lemons so I go online [http://www.buy-meyer-lemon.com/ ] and get them delivered. They pick them right off the tree to fill the order. Do you happen to know of any good Meyer lemon ice cream recipes?
    T3
    Carrville, IA

    • Thanks! I don’t have a Meyer ice cream recipe, but I’ve been using Ruhlman’s recipe for preserved lemons. They are great! Meyer lemon ice cream sounds fabulous! Please share if you find one.

  5. Is it too late to plant some strawberries? I have a raised bed ready to be filled.
    I started an Earthbox in early April and am loving the tomatoes that I’m seeing so far.

    • Sorry, too late for strawberries. They usually produce fruit from early April through mid-May. I planted bare root strawberries in December and they are starting to look heat stressed now. Now is a good time to plant watermelon and canteloupe, though.

  6. Yep, I figured. Glad to be found, either way!

  7. Re the above request for Meyer lemon ice cream, here is one:

    Meyer Lemon Ice Cream
    Really a sherbet, this recipe is perfect for Meyer lemons because there are so few ingredients – lemon, simple syrup, and a little cream – that don’t mask the fruit’s delicate perfume. Serves 8.

    1 1/2 cups water

    1 cup sugar

    1/3 cup grated Meyer lemon rind (from 3 to 4 lemons)

    2/3 cup Meyer lemon juice

    2/3 cup heavy cream

    1. In a small saucepan, stir together the water, sugar, lemon rind and juice. Bring to a boil and cook over medium heat for 2 minutes. Strain the syrup into a bowl. Finely chop 2 tablespoons of the cooked rind and add it to the syrup.

    2. Chill the syrup thoroughly.

    3. Stir the cream into the syrup and freeze the mixture in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

    – Adapted from “Marcella’s Italian Kitchen”

    Anne


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